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IEng Application
SimonJD
1 Posts
Question
Good morning. I have recently decided to apply for an EngTech accreditation. I completed all the applications and supporting evidence, which I sent to a PRA for review. Apart from satisfying all the criteria for EngTech, he commented that my evidence leans more towards IEng. After checking the academic qualifications, I soon discovered that you also require a degree or other forms of higher education......which unfortunately I do not hold. My question is, has anyone gained IEng status without and degree's or higher education (BEng, BSc, etc)? Kind Regards Simon
11 Replies
Simon

If your PRA says you meet the criteria then you probably do - the academic side of things are not mandatory, but a guide to what level you need to demonstrate. If you read the matrix at the end of the UK spec Edition 3 or 4 (being introduce later this year) you will see the competences you have to demonstrate to, initially satisfy the Pre PRI Panel, and then the Interview Panel followed by the Post PRI Panel. The "degree" issues allow a level of acceptance that you have achieved certain of the competences but many IEngs and more recently CEngs achieve registration without the paper qualifications that are mentioned in the book. 

I suggest that you discuss more with your PRA who should be able to guide you to the right wordings and issues you need to bring out what you do and how you do it.

Good Luck - Jim W
Roy Bowdler
832 Posts
I thought that it might be helpful to draw attention to the tradition of linking the registration categories to formal qualifications. For many decades in the UK this was quite rigid. Some professional institutions in the UK and government sponsored bodies in many countries (like immigration) still rely on formal qualifications.  

Since the IET evolved (from IEE & IIE) it has used formal qualifications as “benchmarks”. So for example an IEng should be demonstrating knowledge and understanding at “Bachelors level”. Holding an accredited degree is the best way to show that, with a good relevant degree also close to ideal. However, other combinations of qualifications and/or work-based learning can create an equivalence, which the IET will recognise if it is clear from career achievement.

To achieve recognition as IEng then you must be able to demonstrate successful (ie “competent”) performance as a “responsible engineer”. The UK-SPEC competence framework attempts to differentiate in a generic way between and “Engineer” and a “Technician”.  There isn’t a perfect dividing line and there is overlap, but an engineer should take enhanced technical and management responsibility. 

Typically, a Technician is expert in specific applications of engineering, such as for example routine design, installation or maintenance and as such can operate within the scope of their skills with minimal supervision. They may also supervise and “sign off” some types work as suitable, or in good order. If this is what you hope to illustrate by being Eng Tech, then it is perfectly satisfactory for your needs. Many technicians have great expertise in respect of the equipment and systems that they work with, especially the practical elements, which some more “academically grown” members of the profession may lack.  

If you are clearly meeting the requirements of IEng, then that should be your choice, but I wouldn’t want you to seek IEng only to be disappointed because you fell short in one or more aspects. Your PRA’s comment “evidence leans more towards IEng” , doesn’t necessarily suggest a strong and “complete” IEng case. Can I suggest that you clarify further.       
 
Simon,
As others have pointed out, possessing the exemplifying qualification is only one way of demonstrating that you have the required level of Underpinning Knowledge and Understanding (UK&U) - your engineering and technical theory.  There are plenty of successful IEng and CEng candidates who do not possess the exemplifying qualification, but if they don't, they are required to demonstrate that their UK&U is at the required standard.  There is no absolute requirement for any academic qualification at all.  See page 22 of UK-SPEC third edition. 

When I am advising someone in your situation, I ask them to consider how they will provide evidence of UK&U at the required level in their application.  Some find this relatively easy, some less so.  Thus, in your application, I would expect to see you providing this evidence of UK&U in addition to the evidence that you will provide on the 17 competencies.  This necessarily makes your application somewhat longer than one from someone who has the exemplifying qualification.  If you don't provide this additional information in your application, you may be asked to submit further evidence of UK&U.  This delays your application and having just coached someone through this, it is not an easy task as there is a tight page limit and it is much better if you can provide the evidence in your application.

In summary, it's certainly possible to gain IEng without a degree, but I suggest you work with your PRA to see how you will provide the necessary evidence that your UK&U is at the required standard.  Also do consider what Roy has said about the nature of your work and your career aspirations, as, if Eng Tech will fulfil your needs, there may be little point in possibly getting out of your comfort zone in going for IEng.  Only you will be able to judge this one and you can always apply for IEng at a later date if you wish.
SimonJD
You may want to look up "Paul Meenan" who has worked up from being an apprentice to being a professionally registered engineer (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBzB646L6Xk and   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAKzna71V7xKMTlNTS3eKhA)

It's about demonstrated competence. Fancy certificates obviously help, but they are not what actually matters.
Rhino60
59 Posts
Good Afternoon
I am looking for a bit of advice regarding the presentation part at the I Eng interview.
Do I have to demonstrate knowledge as a designer (which I am not) or can this be something based around my day to day work?
I work in operational engineering (informed client role)
All other aspects, so far, of my application look reasonable (I am a non-graduate) Eng Tech currently.
Current position is UK civil service (electrical installation and associated areas ) 
My history is military/airline/compliance inspection.
Could any one offer some advice please?

Colin
Kathryn Bain
385 Posts
There is a video here: https://www.theiet.org/career/professional-registration/getting-help-with-your-application/your-professional-review-interview/ as well as guidance about the interview Rhino60‍ 

The presentation should be based on your own work presenting a project you have been responsible for and explore the tecnical aspects (A & B competence) so this may include design work, but only if this is relevant to your role.
Simon Barker
806 Posts
Rhino60:
Good Afternoon
I am looking for a bit of advice regarding the presentation part at the I Eng interview.
Do I have to demonstrate knowledge as a designer (which I am not) or can this be something based around my day to day work?
I work in operational engineering (informed client role)
All other aspects, so far, of my application look reasonable (I am a non-graduate) Eng Tech currently.
Current position is UK civil service (electrical installation and associated areas ) 
My history is military/airline/compliance inspection.
Could any one offer some advice please?

Colin

For my presentation, I picked two related projects that I had completed recently.  The presentation was all about what I did on those projects.  The presentation is an opportunity to show what you do, and the interviewers will then ask questions and discuss it with you.

Rhino60
59 Posts
Many thanks Kathryn
Rhino60
59 Posts
Thanks Simon
Roy Bowdler
832 Posts
Some Engineers will primarily carry out “design” work, perhaps even in a “design department”. However, most engineered artefacts or systems, have a “life cycle”, from concept, through detailed design, to installation, maintenance and ultimately decommissioning. Not everyone involved at every stage will need to understand the engineering, but obviously an engineer should.  

In most circumstances, different engineers and technicians will be expert in only part of the whole cycle, but we should reasonably expect them to appreciate the work of others.

To check compliance for example, it is necessary to understand the intent of a design, including an adequate grasp of the underpinning theoretical principles involved.  Equally, it is a poor designer that does not understand the needs of building/maintaining. Various forms of “design” are also usually required throughout the life-cycle.

The historic tradition of professional registration being communicated in quite academic terms and the popularity of CEng among “design” consultants, sometimes obscures what most engineers actually do. The “adequate grasp” that I referred to is commonly around BTEC/ONC/Level 3, for those primarily engaged in operation and maintenance.

To earn an interview for IEng, IET assessors must have decided that you are demonstrating “bachelors degree level” capability. In doing so they will also have valued your work-based learning and expertise.

You may be defining “design” too narrowly in your own mind. Explain your thinking to the interviewers when necessary, not just the procedures that you follow.  Whenever you understand and evaluate any issue technically, then make a decision to change, you are “redesigning”.                 
 
Rhino60
59 Posts
Thanks Roy.
Based on what you have said I could propose a presentation based on my input (client side verification of specification and witness testing) on a project and prepare to be questioned on the various aspects that the project is comprised of?

Colin

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