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Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

15 Replies

Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Maytham Almouthen on Oct 16, 2016 9:54 am

Dear All
I am a new member to IET and in the process of applying for the Ceng. I’ve started writing my employment history section on the application form but as I read the guideline there is a special way to write it. I’ve done a section on it and would like to know if I am in the right track in writing it . I live in UAE and I’ve tried contacting the advisors in my area but no one replied to my emails. Could anyone help me with this matter 
 advising me on what I’ve already written or sample a to see how others done it please?

Maytham

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Shee Chew on Oct 16, 2016 4:00 pm

Please contact your LN committee.

Chris Chew

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Cheong Tsoi on Oct 18, 2016 7:47 am

You could just write from the begining of your first job, then to the recent one OR you could write according to the 17 competences in relate to your job history. Either way will do. You may also talk to your supporters in your CEng MIET application.

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Simon Barker on Oct 18, 2016 8:25 am

I don't know that there is a secret "special way" to write it, but bear in mind that this is your opportunity to show that you have covered all of the competencies in UKSpec. So have a good read of that document first.  Then when writing about your career history, look for things you have done that meet those competencies.  Concentrate on what you did, rather than just what projects you worked on - stress your role in the project.

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Kathryn Bain on Oct 18, 2016 3:35 pm

All the above is good advice, I would generally suggest that you try and show your competences in your career history through the work that you have done and show the progression from any earlier jobs into more recent experience so that it creates a career narrative to show how you have developed.  I would generally suggest that you can use less content on earlier roles if you have covered a number of years of experience (i.e. for more mature candidates) and that you should focus on engineering or technology roles (these roles can be omitted from your application in Career Manager using the "reported" functionality if you prefer to store them for your career records). 

As Simon mentioned, focus on your personal experience (use I, me, my, myself) and give sufficient detail for the size and scope of projects where possible. 

I would also recommend that you spend the time to get the right details, and not write too much as there is also guidance on roughly how long an application should be and getting the right details down in a precise way indicates to the assessors that you can communicate your ideas clearly and that you have read and understood UK-SPEC.  It also helps the assessors to clearly see that you have met the competences.

With regard to contacting assessors, we do ask that you only contact one professional registration advisor and that it can take them a couple of weeks to respond as they are volunteers, but if it has been longer than three weeks then please don't hesitate to contact the registration team who can follow up on this for you.

Kathryn
Kathryn Bain, Senior Product Advisor (Initial Professional Development and Mentoring), The Institution of Engineering & Technology, (IET Staff) Any views are my own views and do not necessarily represent those of the IET

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Maytham Almouthen on Oct 19, 2016 4:32 pm

Many Thanks Shee Chew, Cheong Tsoi, Simon Barker & Kathryn Bain.smiley
Maytham

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Saliya Sajith Samarawickrama on Dec 22, 2019 4:26 pm

Kathryn Bain:
All the above is good advice, I would generally suggest that you try and show your competences in your career history through the work that you have done and show the progression from any earlier jobs into more recent experience so that it creates a career narrative to show how you have developed.  I would generally suggest that you can use less content on earlier roles if you have covered a number of years of experience (i.e. for more mature candidates) and that you should focus on engineering or technology roles (these roles can be omitted from your application in Career Manager using the "reported" functionality if you prefer to store them for your career records). 

As Simon mentioned, focus on your personal experience (use I, me, my, myself) and give sufficient detail for the size and scope of projects where possible. 

I would also recommend that you spend the time to get the right details, and not write too much as there is also guidance on roughly how long an application should be and getting the right details down in a precise way indicates to the assessors that you can communicate your ideas clearly and that you have read and understood UK-SPEC.  It also helps the assessors to clearly see that you have met the competences.

With regard to contacting assessors, we do ask that you only contact one professional registration advisor and that it can take them a couple of weeks to respond as they are volunteers, but if it has been longer than three weeks then please don't hesitate to contact the registration team who can follow up on this for you.

Kathryn

In the Competences, there's a tabular format. Should I follow the same (insert all the data in the tabular format) when writing the Employment responsibilities or should I use a paragraph for each competence? I bit confused. 
Saliya

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Alasdair Anderson on Dec 23, 2019 8:46 am

Saliya Sajith Samarawickrama:

In the Competences, there's a tabular format. Should I follow the same (insert all the data in the tabular format) when writing the Employment responsibilities or should I use a paragraph for each competence? I bit confused. 
Generally a single project example will provide evidence of multiple competences so describe a whole project rather than putting down bits of a project to try to match the competences and you can then look to see if there is any competence missing.
I would also suggest looking through this forum (Professional Registration Matters) as there are many discussions here with excellent advice from the past few years (and also earlier, but if you go back far enough you will see the same questions coming round again).
Alasdair

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Richard Meadows on Dec 30, 2019 9:06 pm

Completely agree with all that has been written.  As a suggestion, Saliya, you could try completing the IPD assessment in Career Manager.  This is a self-assessment tool against which you score yourself on each of the competencies in turn on a scale of 0 (no experience) through 4 (expert).  You then have the opportunity to provide evidence that supports your score.  This latter part is useful as you will be identifying elements of projects that show how you satisfy the competence.  When you have completed the assessment you can look through the scores to check that you have genuinely scored at least 3 on each competence.  You can then look through the evidence and this will tend to indicate which projects are providing the best opportunity to provide evidence in your Career History section.  The work you have done on the IPD is not wasted as this can be verified by your supporter and attached to your application.

If you have a score below 3 this tends to indicate an area where you would normally require some additional experience and is an opportunity for you to discuss with your employer.

I would tend to counsel against using a tabular format for your evidence in Career History as the on-line form does not lend itself to this type of input.  As Alasdair has already stated, a single project should provide multiple opportunities to provide evidence of a range (though not necessarily the full range) of competencies.  There is no reason why you cannot use several projects to demonstrate your competencies, but try to "tell a story" while being concise and to the point as effective communication is one of the D competencies.

As mentioned in the guidance notes, there is a hard-stop of a total of 12 pages for your application (though in some cases, the Career Manager application will put in a blank page at the end that can be ignored).  This does not mean that your application must be 12 pages long, however, do use the page limit wisely.  It is much easier and quicker to put together a strong application than it is to submit a weaker application and then have to go back and provide additional evidence when this is requested.  The latter inevitably delays the application significantly.

A few tips for constructing your evidence - they follow the guidance notes, but many times I find that candidates do not follow these and then have a lot of modifications prior to submission: 
  • As already mentioned by others, use lots of "I" phrases (I proposed, I led, I designed, I presented...) and avoid phrases that could tend to indicate a team achievement (e.g. we constructed, we presented, the XYZ was designed...) as the application is about your skills and competencies, not the team's. 
  • Remember that the people assessing your application may not be as familiar with your company's language as you are - therefore keep to generally understood engineering terms and avoid jargon.
  • Avoid acronyms and abbreviations - if you must use them, they must be defined on first use, but generally, they are best avoided as they make the application harder for the assessors to read. 
  • It is also very easy to wander off and describe a project in great technical detail without describing what you did, which is wasteful of your time and potentially of space too, bearing in mind the 12-page limit.  This is a very common problem with candidates I advise.  Give a brief overview of a project to give context, but keep it brief and then focus on how you used your skills and competencies to fulfil your responsibilities to the project.
If you follow these simple rules and the suggestions made by my colleagues you should be able to put together a strong application.  One final piece of advice - if at all possible do try to seek the advice of a Professional Registration Advisor.  We have lots of experience in assisting candidates like you and can save you a lot of time and frustration.  I hope this is useful.

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Phillip Gavin Lewis on Jan 13, 2020 4:03 pm

I must admit, my recent application was slightly over 12 pages*, but I spaced out the text and put headings and line breaks in for clarity. 

I'm hoping the 12-page "hard-stop" isn't quite as black and white as that and takes into consideration that it is not just 12 pages of unbroken prose?

It also says "your application may be rejected if it is longer than 12 pages". If it is a hard-stop, please consider changing "may" to "will".

(*16 in total, but with one blank page and one page with 1-line of template text (disclaimer). The main body is well spaced and (hopefully) clear)

Regards,
Gav

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Alasdair Anderson on Jan 13, 2020 4:37 pm

Gav,
It is a rather subjective judgement, which also depends on who is looking at it (and therefore is the person making the decision to reject or not). Blank pages and pages with just the disclaimer on will not be counted, but in reality the main criterion is how many pages are needed for the career history. If that is more than about 8 pages then it is longer than it should be. It may be worth looking at it and trimming it a bit, but you refer to "recent application" which makes me think it is already submitted. If your formatting has extended the length in order to ease the readability then I would hope that is recognised and it is processed.
With regard to length there has also been some very good advice elsewhere on this forum (such as https://communities.theiet.org/discussions/viewtopic/795/25332?post_id=131114#p131114 ), but I hope that this will not now be needed in your case.
Alasdair

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Phillip Gavin Lewis on Jan 13, 2020 4:51 pm

Thanks Alasdair, alas, I found this forum too late! I hope so too! And yes, unfortunately, submitted already! Today, in fact!

It was difficult enough to whittle down to this (I know, I know, I've probably written far too much) and to cut anymore I would be wary of not demonstrating the competencies to sufficient detail. 

If it gets bounced back, I will just have to be ruthless, I guess!

Regards,
Gav

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Lee Wood on Jan 28, 2020 1:36 pm

After many years as a PRA I share one similar piece of advice for many draft applications I see. When the applicant writes a certain narrative in the employment history section, I always encourage them to add brackets suggesting which of the competencies they feel the paragraph is covering off against UK-SPEC. By example; 

I designed  and commissioned improvements to the drive system of XXX, resulting in improved flow control and energy reduction, whilst improving the safety system shutdown integrity (A1, B2, C3, etc...) In this manner both the applicant and PRA, if utilised, can form a clear view of how they are covering off the required competencies and also sense check if there is a balance between them across the portfolio of evidence provided. 

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Phillip Gavin Lewis on Jan 28, 2020 1:41 pm

Hi Lee,

Thanks for the advice. This was my first instinct too, but I was actively discouraged from referencing competencies by another PRA, who encouraged me to just write a narrative; "the assessors will decide whether you've met the competencies or not, there's no need for you to annotate your application". Oh well, too late for my application now, but helpful for the OP and others!

Regards,
Gav

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Lee Wood on Jan 28, 2020 1:58 pm

Hi Gav,
I was careful in my wording 😃 

Use of this approach in the draft versions prior to application going forward is my advice. I wouldn't recommend in the final application document, however I have spoken with numerous PRI's in the past who have no issue with that approach. 

Good luck with yours!
 

Re: Writing the employment history in the Ceng Application

Posted by Phillip Gavin Lewis on Jan 28, 2020 2:01 pm

Ah, the subtlety was lost on me! Thank you for the kind wishes!

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