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CEng Technical Report
Looking for a bit of information if possible.

I finished university a couple of years ago with a BEng (Hons) form an accredited course. Soon after uni I got myself a full time job with a engineering consultancy with an IET training scheme. Since then I've been progressing with gaining my chartership status.

I was told that I could gain my chartership status without going back to university to gain a masters degree. Apparently this can be done by producing a technical report. I've been trying to find information about what’s required for this but it's proving difficult. Finding example reports as been impossible! 

Any information, experiences, suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 

Euan 
9 Replies
Donald Lane 70733525
28 Posts
Hello Euan,

The technical report route is not a route that you choose to go down to apply for CEng. It is a route offered by the IET assessment process if they feel they need more information for a candidate to prove that they have the required learning level equivalent to the masters qualifications required.

Your initial application for CEng will be exactly the same as every other candidates. You may be able to show through your work experience or training sheme that you have the knowledge equivalent to the masters and you will be able to gain CEng without having to write a technical report.

If your application does not provide what the assessors are looking for but that they feel there is enough existing evidence that could be expanded by a technical report then you will be offered that route and you will be informed of the requirements of the report at the time. On the other hand if the assessors feel that your application is not going to benefit from a technical report then you would be turned down and advised of the areas of your application that need to be worked on.

A Professional Registration Advisor will be able to explain the application process in more detail and adivse you on your specific application and how close they feel you are to making a successful application. If you are on an IET approved company training scheme then you should have access to the advisors via that scheme.

Good luck with your application.

Kind regards

Donald Lane
Roy Bowdler 603091
815 Posts
 Donald’s response answers Euan’s question but for the benefit of anyone with an interest, my interpretation is set out below.  An advisor with understanding of your sector can help to explore the expectations of a CEng v IEng (benchmark “bachelors level”).  For someone seeking CEng, it is very useful for them to be able to articulate why their specific personal technical and leadership contribution is distinctively CEng rather than IEng. The latest issue of UK-SPEC has set out to make this differentiation clearer.      
 
Engineering Council regulations describe the Technical Report Route. However the way  IET uses this process might be better described as a “work sample” or “an evaluation of work based learning”. The route is used by the IET  as part of a multi-stage, graduated competence assessment process. 
 
It would be very exceptional for someone to have had the opportunity to demonstrate sustained competent practice at CEng standard after two years.  A holder of an accredited BEng is in an excellent position, but also needs to illustrate extending their knowledge to “Masters level” , in order to meet the UK-SPEC benchmark standard at the time when they apply for CEng.  A suitable MSc meets the UK-SPEC benchmark, but may not be the most optimal use of time and resources, so this is a joint decision with an employer.  Formal study of individual modules at Masters level  may offer an alternative option, suitably chosen to reinforce the area of technical expertise being developed, this approach would also be sufficient in conjunction with experiential learning. We don’t at present prescribe a particular number of M level credits, but we can give advice about  individual plans or to employers. 
 
Many career pathways will offer good opportunities to develop work–based learning  and during initial training this evidence can be captured in a portfolio, log-book or similar and evaluated by more experienced registered engineers.  Some employers with accredited Professional Development Schemes have adopted this approach and for those that develop MEng/MSC and  BEng graduates together have ready-made internal benchmarks are available.    
 
Work-based learning is by its nature difficult to predict, although opportunities for learning can be identified and planned. It is often relatively easy to identify in retrospect how and where knowledge has been gained.
In practice IET Members who are able to demonstrate responsibility and achievement in a role which matches the UK-SPEC competences for the category of registration, are usually successful in gaining registration.  If an IET member wishes to gain academic recognition for work-based learning, then an appropriate academic institution is the place to do this.  A number of UK universities offer a work-based model, including the excellent “Gateways” programmes supported by Engineering Council and the IET for example.
 
A fully accredited academic profile is an advantage, especially so in preparation for CEng relatively early in career. However other pathways can be equally successful in similar time scales, a good apprenticeship supported by formal study, with potential options for Technician, IEng and CEng registration is arguably the best option if available.    
Luciano Bacco 81378053
789 Posts
This can be of some heilp:   http://www.tttrain.co.uk/courses/CourseDetails.aspx?ProductCode=M0307

Also :  http://www.igem.org.uk/media/46332/technical%20report%20option%20-%20guidance.doc
active, Its one of the basic technical development so far as an  IET concerned, RULE THE WORLD quote
Dear sir/madam,
Looking for a bit of information if possible.

I finished Engineering Council UK a 8 years ago with a BEng (Hons) form an electrical & electronics course. Now I have completed the PG Diploma in Industrial Automation course at University of Moratuwa, Srilanka. I got myself a full time job with a engineering consultancy companies in more than 20 years with an IET training scheme. Since then I've been progressing with gaining my chartership status.

I was told that I could gain my chartership status without going back to university to gain a masters degree. Apparently this can be done by producing a technical report. I've been trying to find information about what’s required for this but it's proving difficult. Finding example reports as been impossible! 

Any information, experiences, suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 

Rasika Dammasena

 
Andy Millar 33788107
1713 Posts
Hi,

To answer the more basic question, you do not need a Master's degree (or any degree at all) to successfully gain CEng. Just fill in the application form showing that you meet the competences of UKSPEC pages 24-29 http://www.engab.org.uk/engcdocuments/internet/Website/UK-SPEC%20third%20edition%20(1).pdf 

A Master's degree is one way of showing that you partially meet competence A1, but there are lots of other ways, and typically applicants show this by demonstrating that their work keeps stretching their technical knowledge. 

I guess from your message that you are still based in Sri Lanka, I don't know what the position is there for access to IET Professional Registration Advisers, but it's worth checking on the Chartered Engineer registration pages on the main IET site following the links to support from PRAs, or if it's not available locally contact the registration and standards team who hopefully should be able to find someone who can help you remotely.

I did see some figures recently but can't remember where, but I'm pretty sure that it's still the case that the majority of successful CEng registrants do not have Master's degrees, and just apply through the standard route.

Good luck!

Andy

Andy Millar:
I did see some figures recently but can't remember where, but I'm pretty sure that it's still the case that the majority of successful CEng registrants do not have Master's degrees, and just apply through the standard route.

Andy,
How could you forget. It was at the Registration and Standards Conference at the IET in January. The Standard Route is for those who have an accredited Masters degree and for those without it is called the Individual Route. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) the Engineering Council have recognised that about two thirds of applicants are coming through the Individual Route which rather makes a mockery of having the name Standard Route when only 1/3 are 'Standard'. As a result with the reissue of UK-SPEC in the near future, it is going to be renamed the Accredited Route. This shows that CEng without a Masters is not a problem (which is not the same as saying it is easy, but it is not significantly more difficult than if you have an accredited Masters).
I would reaffirm the advice to seek a PRA (or more appropriately an IPRA - International PRA).
Alasdair
Kathryn Bain 97869023
360 Posts
Hi,

As has been mentioned about 70% of applicants we see don't have the accredited qualifications and use previous or other learning (sometimes called further learning or work based learning) to apply with the IET.  We have one single application process so there is no need to worry about looking for a technical report route.  You should prepare an application, and as has been mentioned focus on where you have learned or implemented engineering knowledge.  You should also definitely use a PRA - they are a brilliant IET resource and they can give you the best advice.

If you get stuck and want non-technical advice, e-mail me (as staff) on profdev@theiet.org and I'll be happy to answer any questions about the application, or catch one of our webinars at: PR webinars

Regards

Kathryn
Hi,

I believe there is also a little known nuance that might need consideration with anyone being asked/considering to follow the Technical Report / Individual Route if they are subsequently likely to seek to rely on their CEng/IEng to apply for International academic equivalence under the Washington or Sydney accords. I quote from the Engineering Council Website "https://www.engc.org.uk/international-activity/international-recognition-outside-europe/international-register-of-professional-engineers/"
 

"Please note: Chartered Engineers who do not hold an accredited degree recognised under the Washington Accord, or equivalent academic qualification, are currently not eligible to apply for IntPE(UK) registration.

Although the Engineering Council recognises the competency of these engineers, the IPEA does not yet accept applicants through individual routes. The Engineering Council is hopeful that this situation will change, but this is likely to take a significant period of time."

I am not an expert in these matters and in most cases I doubt this matters, but if it does or you plan to gain international equivalence permitting you to transfer to countries like USA, Australia etc to you then I would advise getting further advice from someone who knows more than me.

Regards,
Graham
Eur Ing Graham Hill CEng, FIET, FRSA, FBCS, CITP

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