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A question to Ancient Mariner

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A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Kelly Marie on Dec 22, 2019 8:35 pm

Hi I wonder if you or anyone else who reads this has a list of medium wave radio stations from any time between 1970 to 1977  thanks in advance Kelly x

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by AncientMariner on Dec 22, 2019 9:50 pm

Hi Kelly

The first one which came to mind was Radio Luxembourg on 208 metres which was 1439 kHz until 1978 when it changed to 1440 kHz

BBC Frequencies Listed in my 1979 Admiralty List of Radio Signals as Radio 4. (Radio 2 in those days was on 200 kHz, now Radio 4 on 198 kHz)
809 kHz Scottish
1340 kHz N.Ireland
908 kHz South East
1088 kHz Midland
692 kHz & 1151 kHz North
1052 kHz & 1457 kHz  West
881 kHz Wales
908 kHz & 1484 kHz London

Also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate_radio_in_the_United_Kingdom

Hope the above helps.
Clive S Carver GCGI IEng MIET MITP

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Kelly Marie on Dec 22, 2019 9:58 pm

That's great thanks do u have any record of a Bulgarian station called stars zag zagora on about 1400 KC?

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Sparkingchip on Dec 22, 2019 10:59 pm

I was an Atlantic 252 listener and listened to it whilst decorating the kids bedrooms many years ago. No streaming then, you either bought a hard copy or listened to what was on the radio.

Andy B.

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Blencathra on Dec 22, 2019 11:04 pm

Fab 208 .. your royal ruler Tony Prince from the Royal Duchy.. interrupted by ads for  Cedarwood aftershave ... sound of a felled tree

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Kelly Marie on Dec 22, 2019 11:05 pm

I remember and loved both those stations such a shame they are gone 

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Sparkingchip on Dec 22, 2019 11:50 pm


Google Earth Link
https://earth.app.goo.gl/yr9xVv
#googleearth

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Sparkingchip on Dec 22, 2019 11:54 pm

It seems there a lot of buried copper under the old Atlantic 252 transmitter.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarkstown_radio_transmitter

The one local to me at Droitwich is on a salt pan which I gather serves the same purpose.

Andy B.

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by ebee on Dec 23, 2019 5:25 am

Did Atlantic 252 feature Scotty McClew?

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Zoomup on Dec 23, 2019 8:25 am

A taste of nostalgia, currently transmitting, perhaps only part time.

Radio Caroline 648 A.M. around Essex and Suffolk, Globally via the internet. Locally on D.A.B.

Z.

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Sparkingchip on Dec 23, 2019 10:46 am

It’s not really the same over the internet.

I know I have said before of this forum, some years ago I worked at a Herefordshire farmhouse with an impressive radio shack in the study, the lady said her husband really contacted farmers in distant places, when I said he could Skype them she told me to wash my mouth out with soap and water.

Andy B.

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Ross Currie on Dec 23, 2019 5:17 pm

AncientMariner:

1340 kHz N.Ireland

Now BBC Radio Ulster on 1341 kHz - still from the diamond shaped Blaw-Knox radiator at Lisnagarvey. I believe it to be the only example of such a radiator in the UK & Ireland.

Ross Currie EngTech TMIET

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by davidwalker2 on Jan 3, 2020 7:28 pm

More on the Blaw-Knox radiator here:

 https://www.bbceng.info/Install/Transmitter%20Projects/Reminiscences/Lisnagarvey/Lisnagarvey_Blaw-Knox.htm

David

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Denis McMahon on Jan 6, 2020 7:18 am

davidwalker2:
More on the Blaw-Knox radiator here:

 https://www.bbceng.info/Install/Transmitter%20Projects/Reminiscences/Lisnagarvey/Lisnagarvey_Blaw-Knox.htm

David

 
Thanks, David. We should be grateful to Aubrey McKibben for this fascinating article. I have been aware of the existence of the Lisnargarvey transmitter for many years but this is a wealth of new interesting information.

Lisnagarvey shared a wavelength (261 m) with Stagshaw in North East England until the mid-sixties. Then Lisnagarvey was given a separate wavelength (224 m), improving the effective range of both  transmitters and enabling full regional separation.

I have my own contribution on medium wave transmitters to present after a short break; watch this space.
Denis McMahon "There is always a better way."

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Denis McMahon on Jan 10, 2020 7:21 am

I can add a few to the Ancient Mariner's helpful initial list.

1214 kHz (247 m) used alongside the Light Programme's long wave transmissions. It came from a few low-to-medium-power transmitters scattered around the country. When  the Light was split into Radios 1 and 2, this frequency was allocated exclusively to Radio 1, with a few extra  low-power transmitters added. This single-wavelength coverage was less than satisfactory for a radio service which, in those days, did not even have  VHF availability.

647 kHz (464 m) used by Radio 3. There was a high-power transmitter at Daventry using this frequency, supplemented by low-power transmitters serving populous areas (e.g. Tyneside) beyond signals of reasonable strength from here.

1546 kHz (194 m) also used by Radio 3, served by a number of low-powered transmitters scattered around the country in populous areas.

Another English speaking service from overseas was the Irish National radio service on 566 kHz (530 m) from the transmitter at Athlone, latterly Tullamore. This service has now been  replaced by the long wave transmissions on 252 kHz (1190 m) - the former Atlantic transmitter. Sparkingchip's web link gives a lot of interesting reading about this.

In the summer of 1972 there was a reshuffle of transmitter frequencies, resulting in the following.
  • Medium wave became available to local radio stations, hitherto using VHF only.
  • The English Radio 4 regional stations were rationalised into fewer frequencies and many familiar wavelengths changed.
  • The midland region lost its 1088 kHz (276 m) frequency from Droitwich. This frequency was reallocated to Crowborough for BBC Overseas services. Droitwich switched to another frequency, 1052 kHz (285m), taken over from Start Point in the West. And so the chain continued.

These changes did not affect regional radio Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland, which still use these frequencies to this day (give or take a kilohertz; see next paragraph).

In November 1978 further changes took place. Frequencies across Europe and Asia were standardised to be exactly divisible by nine. To achieve this, most British medium wave transmitters had their frequency increased by 1 kHz. Some other changes took place at this time.
  • Radio 4 moved to long wave, 200 kHz (1500 m).
  • The 1215 kHz (247 m) network was switched from Radio 1 to Radio 3.
  •  BBC overseas from Crowborough changed to 648 kHz (463 m), the frequency formerly used by the now-redundant Daventry Radio 3 transmitter.
  • Radio 2 now had two main medium wave frequencies, as did Radio 1, substantially improving reception, though it still did not have VHF.

These changes did not take place simultaneously but over several hours stretching from a mid-evening in November overnight. Naturally curious as I am, I had a fun evening, into the night, listening across the medium wave band to what was going on. BBC Overseas, a 24/7 service, was the first to change, with more to do than most. As continental stations progressively changed frequency, there were 1 kHz whistles across many parts of the waveband, caused by beating between interfering transmitters broadcasting 1 kHz apart. By the following morning, all had settled down to the new arrangement.

I still have a useful guide, issued free with the  Radio Times at that time. It takes the form of a card with a sliding middle section. I have set it to show the situation for Radio 2, for which the new frequencies are 909 kHz (330 m) and 693 kHz (433 m). Radio 1 was allocated 275 and 285 m.

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Denis McMahon "There is always a better way."

Re: A question to Ancient Mariner

Posted by Denis McMahon on Jan 13, 2020 2:02 pm

I've done a bit more digging and found this very interesting and detailed account of the history of medium- and long-wave stations in the UK from birth to the present day (almost).

https://www.bbceng.info/Technical%20Reviews/dev_am_tx_nw_6a.pdf
Denis McMahon "There is always a better way."

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