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Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

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Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 10, 2019 8:37 pm

This was the headline in the Guardian Opinion section for May 8 th 2019 written by Aditya Chakrabortty.

To answer this question he examines the history of GEC after Arnold Weinstock left in 1996  and <quote> "all hell broke loose" with the appointment of George Simpson (an accountant), and John Mayo (from the Merchant Banking world).

Even companies outside of Britain (examples RCA and Westinghouse)  have been afflicted by the same upper management failures.

What does Britain have to do to create a business climate that will allow world class companies to thrive?

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 17, 2019 5:55 pm

Andy:

Again showing my age, when I was growing up there were both State run and Private (for profit) run schools .

The Private run schools had a higher level of teachers and equipment (physics, chemistry and maths).

The Labor government after WWII paid the private schools to accept children from low income families.

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 17, 2019 6:22 pm

Andy:

You point about what should Universities teach the students is very valid. With the acceleration of technology, the job market is a moving target. Today's computer based tools will become obsolete in 4 years.

Currently I am taking a course in processing big data sets using Python software .

In 1960 I took my first computer course using assembly language. Since that time I have had to learn multiple (now obsolete) languages up to C++. -- AND I AM NOT A COMPUTER SCIENTIST!

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA

 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 18, 2019 1:52 am

Hello Roy:

The reference to the 1990 paper by Michael Porter is going to take me sometime to read.

However it does not mention (as far as I can see so far) the role of technical standards and the problems of National cartels (example VW diesel emission fraud).

For many years I was directly involved in creation of microcircuit technical standards by the EIA/JEDEC organization and we took great care to prevent cartels from forming within the committees.

By the way we made these technical standards available for "free" on the internet, to get industry and world wide acceptance. I often wonder why the IET charges for their standards. 

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 19, 2019 3:33 pm

How come no one who has contributed to this discussion  made a comment about the article by Professor Dame Ann Dowling  (see E&T magazine Volume 14 issue 4 May 2019 Page 19 ) concerning the formation of the "National Engineering Policy Centre".

Is Salvation to all of the UK business problems at hand? 

The Phase "Trust me I is an engineer" - immediately comes to mind.

Even more the actual article reminds me of the "Party Political Speech" recorded by Peter Sellers in 1958 (available on youtube.com).- Try it, your like it! 

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA
 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 22, 2019 7:47 pm

In an earlier message I mentioned about the DOD's Darpa role in the US in providing seed funding to develop "state of the art" systems.

Today it was announced that they were funding some universities in the development of brain-machine interfaces. 

As an example they want the soldiers on the battle ground to be able control drones using just their brains.

I plan to send the actual announcement into the IET magazine, but I don't expect it to be published.

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA
 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by rogerg on May 23, 2019 7:53 am

You can read more on that here:-
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/05/22/darpa_n3_project/

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Roy Bowdler on May 23, 2019 8:52 am

Perhaps to address the original question, without bringing the industrial and related skills development strategies into it. It has frequently been observed that technology entrepreneurs tend to “sell out” once they can make a comfortable fortune, rather than keep the intellectual property and seek build further. Our own former president perhaps illustrates this trend, by selling out to Huawei  https://plumconsulting.co.uk/profile/william-webb/     

In the light of recent controversy, I have no basis to comment upon Huawei, the power politics involved in the US China relationship, or the potential national security risks that the company might or might not create. I am just in this context, taking the Huawei to be an example global company offered up for the purpose of a discussion about the UKs competitive position.  As I said in an earlier post, I can’t see how the UK can do anything other than maximise its skills-base and develop its productivity, wherever the winds of political change blow.  Obviously the UK generally and the IET in particular has strong relationships with China, which I hope will continue to be mutually beneficial.  I also hope that the current trend of nationalist, populist, political disrupters will prove to be a passing phase rather than a slippery path towards escalating conflict.  Such forces have already caused some bitter divisions in the UK and created a political crisis, so I suppose we had better sort that out first?  

 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Maurice Dixon on May 23, 2019 10:23 am

I believe it does fundamentally come down to having a robust and enduring national industrial strategy. Relying on the market to deliver everything without proper government steer and enduring commitment, has seen many great national inventions and companies sold off for short term profit and leaving the UK very vulnerable to the whims of other nations trading with us, or not, and having to import, vulnerable, external IPR controlled technologies vital to our future.
The UK Industrial Strategy, like all previous government 'strategies', has well meaning words, but what true enduring investment and exploitation commitment that benefits UK plc? Lots of good words about 'Five Foundations' (including digital infrastructure), four 'Grand Challenges' ((including AI and data revolution), five 'Sector Deals' (including AI), setting up an 'Industrial Strategy Council' (set up in Oct-Nov 18 bit what has it done?) and key Industrial Policies (including digital infrastructure and incentivising sectors). What has happened in reality for digitisation and growing and retaining national expertise, technologies and product/service companies to meet these aspirations and, following BREXIT, go out into the promised well-hyped 'new brave world' of trade and commerce and export for UK benefit for decades to come. If there is no true and enduring national industrial strategy (as China has had for decades and is now so dominant in a wide spectrum of future critical sectors and technologies), then the normal UK great innovation but poor exploitation cycle will continue: as great UK innovator companies start on their journeys with UK taxpayer seed corn money and hard earned UK R&D and set up risks, foreign investors/companies/sovereign wealth funds will be allowed to buy them and exploit our national ideas outside the UK.

https://www.gov.uk/government/topical-events/the-uks-industrial-strategy 
 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 23, 2019 2:43 pm

I have one objection to the Title of this article about development of Brain-Computer interfaces- The article uses the word "BLOWN" (which effectively means wasted) instead of the word "INVESTED".

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 23, 2019 5:06 pm

The UK needs to investigate the successful  development of technology in other countries of the about the same population size.

For example Singapore or Taiwan.

Having worked for a South Korea company for a couple of years, I don't think the family centered organization would work in the UK.

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA  

 

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Peter Brooks on May 23, 2019 5:26 pm

One of the UK's biggest problem is the " quick rich" sales of it's successful start up companies to "vampire" oversea organizations.

It is my suggestion that if the government supplies seed money to say a University started company then the applicable patents shall be owned by the Government for (say) 20 years.

Also limit sales of the company to overseas buyers (so that they have a majority ownership) for again (say) 20 years.

Peter Brooks MIET
Palm Bay Florida USA   

Re: Why Doesn't Britain Have a Huauei of its own?

Posted by Maurice Dixon on May 24, 2019 12:35 am

A great suggestion, so we get a good ROI on taxpayer investment, we keep control of tax-payer funded start ups for a good period of time, plus, we set up a self-funding cycle, so that profits from successful, partly government owned share dividends, go back into a re-investment in new start up fund - simples.

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