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Covid - 19 Lighting Solutions
Hi all (In particular health care experienced engineers)
I am reading that many Lighting manufacturers are looking at the introduction of UV-C Type lighting maybe used for wheeling into rooms following Covid 19 exposure within an infected room. Once the infected person has left the room then the lights can be wheeled in and switched on from outside the room or via a timer and left in situ which in theory kills the virus. In theory like a fumigation process using Lighting. I know these type of lights can be dangerous and they cause temporary damage to the cornea if observed directly and UV-C is also a carcinogen for human skin. Obviously installed in a controlled environment with limited/no exposure time is the golden rule here using these lights which must have a safe purification wavelength. Does anyone have any guidance on this as personally i think it should come from Public Health ? 
3 Replies
REHVA have a document regarding Building Services which states nothing about Lighting - REHVA procedures are as follows:

Summary of practical measures for building services operation
1. Secure ventilation of spaces with outdoor air
2. Switch ventilation to nominal speed at least 2 hours before the building usage time and switch to lower speed 2 hours after the building usage time
3. At nights and weekends, do not switch ventilation off, but keep systems running at lower speed
4. Ensure regular airing with windows (even in mechanically ventilated buildings)
5. Keep toilet ventilation 24/7 in operation
6. Avoid open windows in toilets to assure the right direction of ventilation
7. Instruct building occupants to flush toilets with closed lid
8. Switch air handling units with re-circulation to 100% outdoor air
9. Inspect heat recovery equipment to be sure that leakages are under control
10. Switch fan coils either off or operate so that fans are continuously on
11. Do not change heating, cooling and possible humidification setpoints
12. Do not plan duct cleaning for this period
13. Replace central outdoor air and extract air filters as usually, according to maintenance schedule
14. Regular filter replacement and maintenance works shall be performed with common protective measures including respiratory protection
OMS
694 Posts
Eddie Currents:
Hi all (In particular health care experienced engineers)
I am reading that many Lighting manufacturers are looking at the introduction of UV-C Type lighting maybe used for wheeling into rooms following Covid 19 exposure within an infected room. Once the infected person has left the room then the lights can be wheeled in and switched on from outside the room or via a timer and left in situ which in theory kills the virus. In theory like a fumigation process using Lighting. I know these type of lights can be dangerous and they cause temporary damage to the cornea if observed directly and UV-C is also a carcinogen for human skin. Obviously installed in a controlled environment with limited/no exposure time is the golden rule here using these lights which must have a safe purification wavelength. Does anyone have any guidance on this as personally i think it should come from Public Health ? 

It's perfectly feasible to use mobile lamp units emitting UV-C at or around peak wavelength of 254 nm which is close to the germicidal susceptibility peak. As you've identified, you don't want people  present. You also have to be sure the light is impacting all relevant surfaces to be effective - and therein lies the problem. You can get mobile robot units that can reasonably effectively patrol a room and sweep all the surfaces with light  - however, my limited experience of them in Healthcare settings is that a cleaning team is usually more effective  - certainly I've seen swab and smear tests of rooms that have had quite long exposure to UV-C come back from infection control with positive cultures of some pretty nasty stuff from areas where it's reasonable to deduce that some shielding of light was going on.

In a stripped out room with furniture and fixtures undergoing separate decontam, they are more useful. In most healthcare settings, time is important so it's a balance of effectiveness against the next occupation

In a healthcare setting, I'd expect the infection control team to be giving guidance

Regards

OMS

Great information that thank you. I did suggest they take guidance from Public Health but not sure if the feedback from Public Health would be as in depth as your great response. I was asked for some guidance from someone to help them form a business continuity plan for helping towards getting people back in to schools and public buildings in our organisation. 

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