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EICR Valid?
Day567
12 Posts
Question

Hello,

I recieved an EICR for my Private Rented property from the landord. However, the post code of the address is wrong. Is the EICR still valid? It was done over a year ago, so Is it allowed to be corrected via just changing the post code or do the whole electrics need to be retested/inspected?

53 Replies

Presumably, the Address is correct, in which case adding the correct postcode would be fine. Do not change anything else!

Day567
12 Posts

Thanks for the response - but how do I know for certain if the electrics have been done correctly at the correct address if the postcode is wrong? I had a British Gas engineer tell me the certificate would become void, he also seemed concerned at my electrics tripping and suggested they could have been installed incorrectly - when I told my landlord this, they cancelled British Gas and involved the electrician who did the EICR despite them having a care package with British Gas, which includes EICR. I am struggling to find any concrete legislation on the specific issue.

aligarjon
149 Posts

I would be more inclined to listen to a qualified electrician than a gas engineer. If the guy was given an incorrect post code get him to change when he is there.  A lot can happen in a year, it could be tripping out for many reasons that weren't there before you moved in.  It could well be one of your appliances or a bit of damp in an outside light

Gary

Interesting question but the answer is that the postcode is for the post office to use and is an addition to your address. If you look at the deeds to an older property you will not find a postcode, but this does not change the property identification. A postcode covers around 20 properties, it is not specific to your house, even the post office still uses the number. Some other countries do have postcodes that identify single properties, this may happen here for large buildings, but not usually domestics.

Do British Gas technicians involve themselves with electrical installation condition reports these days?

Although, I have known them to get rather twitchy when checking the main equipotential bonding.

Legh

Day567
12 Posts
Hello, 

thanks for the reply and sorry for the confusion, British Gas is just the name of the company - they do both gas and electric and are one of the biggest power companies in the U.K.. I contacted British Gas as instructed by landlord (after weeks of reporting the issue I might add, which they consistently tried to imply I was making up the issue with electrics) due to British Gas being their emergency contact for electrical repairs. They sent around an electrician to investigate a faulty plug socket and my electrics tripping - they rendered the plug socket unsafe and unusable as well as arranging a date for them to return to carry out their investigation into the electrics properly. They suspected the electrics to be installed incorrectly.

As soon as I told my landlord this, they suddenly deemed my issue as “urgent” and involved this other electrician, despite having a care plan with British Gas and the appointment already being made.

I have to admit I do not trust this electrician and would rather them stick to using the independent British Gas company as I have had constant problems with them. For example, my electric hob stopped turning off, which I reported on 02/09 and they left me for well over a week without disconnecting it or replacing it. The new hob they sent still doesn’t work, probably due to them not using a qualified electrician to install it either. As well as them refusing to carry out repairs on a cupboard that is falling to pieces (due to wear and tear), a thread bare carpet, disconnected wooden floors, a broken fire door - the list goes on.
Chris Pearson
3196 Posts

In law in general, typos and slips of the pen do not invalidate a document and they can be corrected, so if the postcode is nearly right and the rest of the address is correct, the EICR remains valid.

I too would be concerned by your tripping electrics - something is wrong there.

I am a bit confused about the BG “care package”, which is a type of insurance. I would be very surprised if it included an EICR although a technician might very well test something and tell you that it does not comply with the Wiring Regulations.

Day567
12 Posts
Hello,

I am not sure what exactly the British Gas Care Package thing includes precisely as I am not a landlord. However, the engineer did definitely say that EICR is a service the company offers.

As I have said in another response, I would rather the landlord use British Gas as they are a trustworthy company. And I have had numerous problems with my landlords - as I stated I reported my problem with the electrics weeks before they finally gave me a number to British Gas to get it investigated in the first place. They also heavily tried to suggest I was making up the issues with the electrics as well. I fear that there is something dodgy going on myself, I used the Competent Electric Checker (an officially government website) and the electrician they used for the EICR, which is the same one they’ve decided to involved for the electrics now, was listed as not being qualified to do inspections. When I enquired about this, they became cagey and said I was being “inappropriate” for asking to check if he is qualified.

They have also been reluctant to do many other major repairs such as a broken fire door, a faulty electric hob (which has been well over a month now), thread bare carpets (which weren’t shown to me prior to moving in), broken and mouldy cupboards, mouldy washer machines, mould in the bedroom, blocked drains, disconnected floor boards. All these problems existed prior to me moving in and I have only lived there since July as well. And most of these problems they have flat out told me they won’t fixed despite being responsible for them.
Chris Pearson
3196 Posts

davezawadi (David Stone): 
Interesting question but the answer is that the postcode is for the post office to use and is an addition to your address. If you look at the deeds to an older property you will not find a postcode, but this does not change the property identification.

Good point! Our house has not only changed its name, but its address too.

Grumpy
130 Posts

I'm afraid that if you consider British Gas to be a “trustworthy company” then you are bordering on the delusional.

I have been on the sharp end watching BG “engineers” sic try to fix a boiler problem and I wouldn't let those muppets loose on electrical fault finding. They'd have your gaff rewired in a flash!

Day567
12 Posts

Hello,

seeing as you must be familiar with EICR - I have another query. Does the back page of the document need to be filled in? The one that is allocated to circuit designation? As on the EICR it is completely blank.

 

Chris Pearson
3196 Posts

Day567: 
seeing as you must be familiar with EICR - I have another query. Does the back page of the document need to be filled in? The one that is allocated to circuit designation? As on the EICR it is completely blank.

If you mean the generic schedule of test results, that is essential. It is, arguably, the most important part. No schedule = no EICR.

Day567
12 Posts

I have attached an image of the back page of the EICR document as well as the file for the whole EICR: just to confirm you are saying that due to this being completely blank the EICR is void?
 


 Moderator Edit: Attachment removed.

mapj1
4321 Posts

well that is very disappointing. Unless there is another sheet a bit  like that that came separate to  the report but filled out ?

This is supposed to be the bit that describes the installation. As a general rule there should be at least one line per fuse or circuit breaker in the consumer unit, and perhaps a few additional notes if there are unexpected extras like the landing light on a different circuit to the rest of the upstairs lights - it happens 🙄.

You can then deduce that the lights are on fuse no 3 or whatever, the type of cable used, and what the earth test results and insulation readings were.

Without that trying to deduce what is there without actually taking it all to bits is a bit of a non-starter.

Also surprised this flat has no bath or shower, as all NA in the last section …

Mike.

Chris Pearson
3196 Posts

Day567: 
I have attached an image of the back page of the EICR document as well as the file for the whole EICR: just to confirm you are saying that due to this being completely blank the EICR is void?

It isn't so much void as incomplete.

The paperwork seems to be a bit of a mongrel - it is not the current model form or the one before it. As Mike says, presumably there is a bathroom.

There are other errors: e.g. Item 4.20 - I doubt that SPD is fitted. There seems to be a generator. PFC = 0.2 kA on page 3 but 1.07 kA on page 8.

ETA: the electrician was a member of the Stroma scheme, but that has been taken over by NAPIT and his details appear in their register. You may wish to contact them.

Colin Haggett
217 Posts

Could you post a photo of the consumer unit please.

Chris Pearson
3196 Posts

Sparkingchip: 
It looks like the electrician didn’t put the postcode into his sat nav to guide him to the job.

No, but the road name is very apt. 😁

Alan Capon
511 Posts

Although it does say it is a visual report, much of the circuit chart could have been easily completed. If he actually visited the property, it could only have been for a few minutes, as others have said, he never discovered the bathroom. 

Regards,

Alan. 

Chris Pearson
3196 Posts

Alan Capon: 
Although it does say it is a visual report …

I don't think that that will do.

Chapter 65 refers to inspection and testing (my emphasis), but more importantly, R.3 of the ESSPRS Regulations 2020 requires that the installation be inspected and tested.

I might add that for a small domestic installation, a 20% sample is not adequate.

Day567
12 Posts
Hello,

Thanks for the response. Reading through the forum I am growing more concerned over whether the EICR was done correctly or if people have suggested, he simply just filled it in without actually testing the property. This is why I am suspicious of this electrician as I do not see why my landlord originally told me to contact British Gas and then suddenly decided to use this specific electrician who did the EICR after British Gas determined one of the plug sockets to be unsafe (it was falling out the wall) and needing to conduct a proper investigation into the electrics to determine the tripping. 

I do live in a one bedroom flat, which contains a living/kitchen space, a bedroom and a bathroom. If these things are missing I am highly concerned. There is no gas in the property as well, so the shower is electric, the boilers/water tanks in both the bathroom and kitchen are electric. The hob and oven are electric. The fridge and freezer are electric.

I have attached a picture of my fuse box. Please not that none of the labels under fuses are accurate. For example, the fuse labelled "Water Heater" does not do the water heater, instead it has all the sockets in the living/kitchen space, the hob and the washer machine on the circuit - this is also the fuse that keeps tripping. I have no idea what circuits the lights, water heaters, bedroom sockets or anything else is on. British Gas suspected that the installation of the electrics is wrong hence the tripping.

The fuse box below is the only one in my flat, the electric metre is downstairs in a cellar and I do not have access to it - which makes getting metre readings for my electric bills difficult as I have to contact my landlord to send someone out to get me a reading.
 
Day567
12 Posts

Thank you for your reply.

 

There is no other sheet and I have said in another comment, there is definitley a shower - an electric one too. 

 

I will attach an image of the fuse box. It supposedly has lables, but none of them are correct. For example, the fuse labelled “Water Heater” essentially is the fuse for anything but the water heater - it is the one that keeps tripping and has all the plug sockets in the living/kitchen space, the hob and the washer machine (I'm also unsure if the bedroom plug sockets are off as well as the British Gas engineer turned it off when he was looking at the socket in the bedroom). I have no idea what circuits the lights, oven, kitchen water heater (which by the way was not working when I moved in both the fuse and the water heater itself had broken), bathroom water heater and/or shower are on.

f301710740ce37936a64d761e2a4bfd8-origina
Sparkingchip
4733 Posts

Just move into another flat ASAP, this one isn’t worth the hassle.

Day567
12 Posts
I am moving next week but the problem is the tenancy agreement and dodgy landlords trying to suggest I am making up problems. I followed advice from shelter and the electrician they used to do the EICR did not come up as being  able to do inspections on the electrical comptetent person checker (https://www.electricalcompetentperson.co.uk/Search). Concerned, I told them I would rather stick to the British Gas for the electrics. They told me I was being inappropriate for this and then the electrician rang me up, shouting at me and telling me I made him uncomfortable for wanting to check his qualifications - he even called me a 'pain in the arse' despite me being well in my rights to check these things.

I am just trying to make sure the flat is safe. I have had nothing but problems from these landlords and I only wanted to leave them after they left me several days with a hob that would not turn off, and that was the final straw. Bare in mind, its a month later and the replacement hob still does not work either as the back two rings will not turn on at all. The day I moved in the hot water tank had gone in the kitchen (Clearly not been checked in between swapping tenants), took them 28 days to fix it. Similarly, the washer machine/dryer had stopped getting hot (again not checked in between tenants) and was filled with mould in the door seal, tray - everywhere. Cupboards are falling apart, wooden flooring coming disconnected - some pieces even move if you stand on them, carpet is thread bare, drains are blocked (saw a centipede crawl out my bathroom sink the other day), fire door is not functional - the list goes on. They refuse to fix any of it. They also kept violating my rights and sending their handyman round to eventually fix some things without warning. They even gave him a key so he could just walk in!

Then they wonder why I want to leave and keep trying to spin things and imply I have somehow conjured these problems up because I am 'unhappy'. It took them weeks to finally give me a number to call over my electrics. Weeks!
Day567
12 Posts

Just for more context: British Gas are coming back on the 18/10/2021 to do their investigation.

as for the faulty plug socket - the plug socket itself is fine it’s the wall around it that is crumbling away meaning it wouldn’t be a job for an electrician anyway. The only solution British Gas could offer would be to move the plug socket. I might add that the electrician the landlords sent round had no intention of doing anything with the plug socket that is unsafe. His solution to my tripping was to switch the 16 to a 32 and leave it at that. No investigation. Nothing.

I think the reason why the landlord doesn’t want British Gas involved because the electrics are dodgy and if they have been wired wrong, the property would fail inspection. This could lead to it being condemned and then that’s not just my flat that is no longer usable but the whole building.

the other thing that concerns me is the sheet says there has not been alterations to the electrics within 25 years, but the flats I live in were originally a house, which has been converted into 4 apartments. So I am assuming they must have been altered to some degree in order to convert the house? My flat is also in the attic.

Colin Haggett
217 Posts

Your landlord  needs to have a proper EICR carried out ASAP as the present one is worthless and I doubt they even entered the premises yet alone got their tester out.

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