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IEC 60417 5036 high voltage symbol
Question
HI

Where is it appropriate and not appropriate to use the high voltage lightning strike symbol on products?

Thanks

Louis

5 Replies
mapj1
2352 Posts
The same graphic is also seen as the centre of the ISO 'warning electrical hazard' sign (same arrow but inside a yellow filled black outlined triangle.). That in turn may not just mean 'high voltage' in the strict BSI sense, just that there is a hazard, so you may see it on low voltage things where there is an arc risk, so on doors that expose battery terminals with potential for kA faults, as well as things that really are high voltages, like transformers for Xray machines and neon signs...  In ISO  land it is usually accompanied by some words.
-2400-
86 Posts
Hands2bfree:
HI

Where is it appropriate and not appropriate to use the high voltage lightning strike symbol on products?

Thanks

Louis

The answer is where it is deemed appropriate or not by the relevant product standard.
There are many different product standards.
There are also multiple members of this forum with experience of different standards... so if you have a specific product in mind, you might get a more specific answer 👍

gkenyon
1167 Posts
There is a list of standards (mainly product standards) in which the symbol is specifically referenced, on the ISO/IEC online browsing platform page for that symbol: https://www.iso.org/obp/ui#iec:grs:60417:5036

In many of those standards, it's generally warning of a voltage that's considered hazardous, which could well include low voltage, or voltages other than SELV or PELV (note that in product standards, the upper limit of SELV and PELV may be at a much lower voltage than BS 7671, as the product standard may consider use of the equipment in wet environment - similar to the limit on SELV and PELV in some of the sections in Part 7, e.g. Section 701, 702, 710, etc.).

It also appears composite in other symbols in IEC 60417, e.g. those for isolating transformers with output 1 kV to 15 kV (6066, 6067, 6068), shield for protection against electric arc flash hazard, e.g. on protective clothing (6353)


As has been mentioned, it also appears in BS EN ISO 7010, in the following registered safety signs:
  • ISO 7010-M032 Mandatory sign "Wear anti-static footwear"
  • ISO 7010-W012 Warning sign "Take care to avoid contact with electricity" (at any voltage deemed hazardous, which could be low voltage)
  • ISO 7010-W042 Warning sign "Warning: Arc flash"
I think you are chasing shadows with this question as there is no definition of "High Voltage".
Some consider 33kV to be medium voltage and it is not high until you get to 132kV.
gkenyon
1167 Posts
Harry Macdonald:
I think you are chasing shadows with this question as there is no definition of "High Voltage".
Some consider 33kV to be medium voltage and it is not high until you get to 132kV.

Overall, yes. In reality, the definition is left to individual standards ... where it's needed.

High Voltage in BS 7671 is classed as anything above Low Voltage.

In the newer automotive mindustry standards for electric vehicles, the voltage threshold for High Voltage is in the range we might class as Low Voltage in BS 7671 ..

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