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EV charging being disabled?
perspicacious
339 Posts
Question
Provocative title prompted by a client taking me for a drive in his EV,
He extolled the virtues of being able to use his smartphone to select charge times at home to suit cheap tariffs.
He added that the car's software was allegedly updated on an ongoing basis.
I was thinking, theoretically, what is stopping either the car manufacturer disabling the charge process either completely or partially, yet alone any other functions such as being able to open the car door to get in?!!!!!!
Or a hacker doing the same?
Just wondering..............

Regards

BOD
 
4 Replies
Chris Pearson
1531 Posts
perspicacious:
Provocative title prompted by a client taking me for a drive in his EV,
He extolled the virtues of being able to use his smartphone to select charge times at home to suit cheap tariffs.
He added that the car's software was allegedly updated on an ongoing basis.
I was thinking, theoretically, what is stopping either the car manufacturer disabling the charge process either completely or partially, yet alone any other functions such as being able to open the car door to get in?!!!!!!
Or a hacker doing the same?
Just wondering..............

Don't get me started on vehicle software - this week I discovered that I shall never again be able to wind down the windows in my 2006 M-B until, at a price, the software is updated. 🙁

But I digress ...

Does the smartphone tell the car what to do, or the charger what to do?

How is the software updated? Via the charger, satellite, wifi, bluetooth, WHY?

Would the manufacturer want to disable the car? Perhaps! Might be useful if a car were reported as stolen.

Same as any 'puter, wired connexions are much more difficult to hack than wireless ones.

Some years ago, a colleague pointed out that smartphones are not 'phones, but a small computers which have the facility to make telephone calls.

Perhaps the same is becoming true of cars: computers which have the ability to take you from A to B. (Soon you won't even have to do the driving.)

AJJewsbury
1677 Posts
He added that the car's software was allegedly updated on an ongoing basis. I was thinking, theoretically, what is stopping either the car manufacturer disabling the charge process either completely or partially, yet alone any other functions such as being able to open the car door to get in?!!!!!!
Such is modern life. The smart phone itself might stop working if it's of Chinese origin and a certain US president gets his way - or indeed any number of other foreign (or even domestic) 'actors'. My wireless speaker system has lost functionality because the manufacturer decided on a controller upgrade and removed functions they considered underused on the platform I happened to use. Power station control systems could be hacked - losing power entire regions not just one car. Any number of cheap IP-connected video devices are readily hackable and could be used to make your local network unusable.

If it's any consolation even the old manual and paper systems were very open to abuse - from ID checks to polling stations to guards on doors to checking of signatures - but it very rarely was abused to any dangerous degree. Hopefully there will be a similar lack of balance between effort and reward so that people generally still won't bother causing too much trouble.

   - Andy.
Sparkingchip
2675 Posts
It all started when vehicle manufacturers started fitting cup holders, before those were installed cars and vans were much easier to maintain, now as a rule of thumb the more cup holders there are the more complicated the vehicle is.

 Andy B. 
mapj1
2170 Posts
You may find it amusing to realise there is a whole book already written on cyber attacks on cars.
here .

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