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Bill Talisman main switch
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
Question
Can anyone point me in the direction of a data sheet and BS number?





 
16 Replies
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
I tried "phone a friend" and he said Google BS symbols to see what the "drawbridge and X" symbol indicates it is, but I have not had much luck doing so.

Does the "drawbridge and X" symbol indicate it is a circuit breaker? If so I presume it is a single pole 80-amp circuit breaker that throws the attached interlinked switch in the neutral.

There is not any provision to lock it off, so again I presume, it's not an isolator. There are two intake rooms with one of these panels either side of the central intake and I think the T's on the front of the devices stands for Talisman, there are some other devices that say Bill on them

Andy Betteridge
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
enter image description here
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
Bill/MEM TLG801 80-amp MCCB IEC60947-3 with neutral switching.

These landlords EICRs are fun! At least I have already two to do in the same building, so the research time can be split between them.

Andy B.
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
I could probably found that out by removing the steel front cover, but not unsurprisingly I will make not dismantling the intake equipment a limitation!

Andy B.
AJJewsbury
1694 Posts
I think those Australian symbols look slightly different to the ones I'm used to - but the basics look the same - i.e. a "bar" across the fixed contact indicate an isolation gap when open and the "x" overcurrent protection - so yes a simple CB. As yours symbol seems only to show a single switching element I would suspect the main MCCB part doesn't switch N (I can't see any N terminals on the one you linked to either, despite the link title).

The plain unit to the left of each MCCB - is that just a blank or might it be an add-on contact for N? Is the side label you show from the N block (if that's what it is) or from the main MCCB?

Most standards seem to require things that they apply to be marked with their standard number - so I suspect this would be most easily solved by removing the cover....(but 60947 sounds entirely plausible).

I don't think there's any general requirement for an isolator to have an in-built means of locking-off - it may need some add-on gadget or rely on locking the overall case or just not be intended for isolating remote items.

    - Andy.
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
The blue blank plate “pops off” and there is a switch mechanism in the neutral side.

Considering the distribution cable goes up four storeys from the cellar then to the other end of the building, a run of about 80 metres, and I was swapping out the main switch in the consumer unit for a 30 mA RCD to avoid a C2 and C3’s on the report, being able to lock it off easily would be an major advantage.

My plan when I got there was to take a fuse out and put it in my pocket, but there wasn’t one to take out.

Andy B.
Have you tried contacting MEM / Eaton ? - I think that this company was 'swallowed' by Eaton.

Regards

Mike
 
dgmeica
5 Posts
It looks like a G frame MCCB so possibly a TLG801, which I think is a 947-2
Alcomax
196 Posts
Well that worked, sort of.  I was going to post with above Eaton PDF:

I am sure Eaton will not mind posting this. It is what they will email out for enquiries for data for MEM [ MGL/MFN] and BILL [TLG/ TNF].

Edit: gave up trying ordinary text after pasting in the PDF. Easier to have a 2nd post, though I am sure there is a method.
mapj1
2177 Posts
one of the neater ways of avoiding a ryefield box. Lets hope it is all deburred inside and they have not accidentally put the neutral of flat 12 in the slot for flat 11, as it would al work, but make isolation a bit scary.
.Does the 'T' button do anything ?
Maybe you can lock the room/cupboard ? I have seen things done with a bike lock in an emergency case..
i presume you do not want to pull the fuse under the meter for the flat in question.
 
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
I think the T is for Talisman, there definitely is not a test function and it is definitely a switched neutral as I did an insulation test on the other end of the distribution cable in the flat.

For the EICR I am treating this as suppliers equipment, however as was pointed out to me on the phone last night it’s after the meter, so is probably the property of the leaseholder of the flat as there won’t be a BNO.

There are forty six of these in the panel that are around sixteen years old, the flats are all electric without E7 and storage heaters, so all the heating is on these supplies, I cannot imagine any of these devices have been stressed, but if one fails it will be interesting to see what it gets replaced with and by whom, I guess the individual leaseholder for the flat concerned will end up footing the bill.

Andy B
Sparkingchip
2710 Posts
There’s forty six flats, I already have two EICRs to do in the block, if half the flats in the block are tenanted there could potentially be around twenty electricians inspecting these panels within the next seven months, I guess some of them might feel the urge to open them up, but I certainly do not!

Andy B

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