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Shocked Child. But How?

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Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Zoomup on Dec 2, 2019 7:49 pm

Waddayou reckon happened here then?

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7747715/Mother-shares-shock-warning-little-girl-burnt-iPhone-charger.html

Z.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Sparkingchip on Dec 2, 2019 8:22 pm

It must have been written by an Australian reporter rather than a Daily Mail reporter here in the UK as it explains clearly what happened.

The kiddie tried to plug the phone end of the charger lead into a multi-way power strip socket.

Andy B.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Zoomup on Dec 2, 2019 8:51 pm

Sparkingchip:
It must have been written by an Australian reporter rather than a Daily Mail reporter here in the UK as it explains clearly what happened.

The kiddie tried to plug the phone end of the charger lead into a multi-way power strip socket.

Andy B.

So, don't the Australian sockets have shutters?

Z.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by gkenyon on Dec 2, 2019 9:19 pm

Most countries' outlets don't have shutters.

 
Graham Kenyon, Managing Director, G Kenyon Technology Ltd www.gkenyontech.com G Kenyon Technology Ltd Logo © G Kenyon Technology Ltd 2015-2019

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by mapj1 on Dec 2, 2019 11:59 pm

Oz mains plug (10A variant - higher current is rare domestically but has longer slots)
1a342aca9dd3da9b24cd3ed48c7f09aa-huge-oz


- higher slots at a push with some manufacturing tolerance and a bit of force may well take the plug designed to fit one of these

d65a2ba4d2b2f80ae49db053852b0aaf-huge-mi


common connector on modern phones, 5 pins to allow sensing so phone can be a slave when connected to a PC for uploading pics, and a master when connected to a USB drive or other peripheral.
 

 
regards Mike

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by ebee on Dec 3, 2019 6:37 am

I wired a few aussie plugs for my Daughter whilst in Oz with her. I must admit I appreciate our own beloved BS 1363 they seem more robust than Oz and European set ups.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Zoomup on Dec 3, 2019 8:57 am

gkenyon:
Most countries' outlets don't have shutters.

 

Just SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooooo backward.

Z.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by David E on Dec 3, 2019 11:38 am

Looks like an Apple lightning connector would fit in an Aussie socket :(

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning_(connector) suggests dimensions are 6.7 mm by 1.5 mm.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets#Australian/New_Zealand_standard_AS/NZS_3112_(Type_I),_used_in_Australasia suggests that The Australian plug pins are 6.5 by 1.6 mm,

0.2 mm clearance could well exist in the socket holes and even if not a little force would probably do it. A surprisingly good fit so I'd be surprised if this is the only time this happens.

I'm very grateful for BS1363. I suppose those dreadful socket covers are appropriate in most countries.

 

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by mapj1 on Dec 3, 2019 12:06 pm

i presume the other end of the charger was plugged in so the micro USB or apple connector body was earthed as it got posted in the live slot of the adjacent socket, - there would not be the  flash bang event otherwise, as the current though the child would be limited by the body resistance. (and then you'd expect the ohmic dissipation to lead to entry and exit damage to the skin.)
regards Mike

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by jbrameld on Dec 3, 2019 1:12 pm

My reading of this is it is more likely to have been a flash burn, rather than an actual elevtric shock caused by current passing through the body - hence the large black mark and absence of exit evidence.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Chris Pearson on Dec 3, 2019 1:38 pm

jbrameld:
My reading of this is it is more likely to have been a flash burn, rather than an actual elevtric shock caused by current passing through the body - hence the large black mark and absence of exit evidence.

Quite possibly, but an electrical burn depends upon current density. Old-fashioned single pole diathermy (surgeons for the use of) uses a pair of forceps or other pointy instrument at the cutting/sealing end and a large pad at the other.

Similarly, whilst defibrillators may leave a red mark, they do not burn the skin.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by jbrameld on Dec 3, 2019 2:59 pm

Chris Pearson:

 

Quite possibly, but an electrical burn depends upon current density. Old-fashioned single pole diathermy (surgeons for the use of) uses a pair of forceps or other pointy instrument at the cutting/sealing end and a large pad at the other.

Similarly, whilst defibrillators may leave a red mark, they do not burn the skin.

 

If you look at the size of the burn in the photo, and the adjacent scorch marks on the fingers/palm, it looks to me like this is the result of a flash effectively happenning 'inside' a closed hand placed over the an arcing contact.  The article says it was done on a power block, so potentially flat on the floor with the hand above.

Still looks nasty by whatever mechnism.

Jason.

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Alan Capon on Dec 3, 2019 9:38 pm

I agree. This does not look like a burn caused by electrical current. It looks more like a flash burn in an enclosed space - a closed hand, It is likely that some force was needed to insert the connector into the live receptacle. We also do not know where the flash came from. It could just as easily come from where the cable joins the plug, either due to the point of failure, or being channelled through the hollow plug. 

It is conceivable the child did receive an electric shock that threw her, but I am not convinced that is the cause of the burn. 

Regards,

Alan. 

Re: Shocked Child. But How?

Posted by Chris Pearson on Dec 4, 2019 6:22 pm

Alan Capon:
It is conceivable the child did receive an electric shock that threw her, but I am not convinced that is the cause of the burn. 

Nor does it require the experience of a neurosurgeon to know that the normal reaction to pain is to withdraw from the cause.

I got my first belt at the age of about 8. It threw me out of my bed. Or rather, I thought to myself (in an instant) what the **** was that and jumped out away from danger. 😁

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