A Volunteer in Godzone (aka New Zealand)

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There's obviously more than one IET volunteer resident in New Zealand (aka Godzone), but I don't think anyone else is blogging yet, so first in, first served (mwahahahaha).  I volunteer in a variety of roles - currently I'm a committee member of my Local Network (South Island), a member of NZ Forum, and chair of the Communities Committee - Asia Pacific (CC-AP) (which also means I'm a member of the Communities Resourcing Committee (CRC)).
 
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Latest Posts

  • Who let me teach second year students?
    Those of you who read my blog regularly will know that I was preparing lecture notes in my last update.  I'm now a few weeks into term, and it's been pretty interesting!  The very first lecture was a bit nerve-wracking, and I spoke far too fast.  The major problem with this (from my point of view anyway) was that I ended up using half of the material I'd prepared for the second lecture, as well as all that I'd prepared for the first lecture.  Not to mention that it meant the students had to somehow follow all of this as well...  read more...
  • Good news all around...
    I thought I'd share with you all the fact that this month has been a pretty good one, for a couple of reasons.  Firstly, I got the letter saying my CEng application had been successful .  As you can imagine, I'm very pleased - I felt that the interview had gone poorly (which is pretty normal for me and interviews), so I was a bit nervous.  Now all that remains to be done is a bit of paperwork, and I can officially add CEng to my postnominals.  Not that I really need more letters after my name - I'm a bit of a study geek to be honest.  Well actually, if I'm really being honest, I'm more than a bit of a study geek - a huge study geek would be a better description...  But there's worse hobbies to have.  Mind you, there's also cheaper hobbies!   read more...
  • The best things in life are free - and often unexpected :)
    During the NZ Forum committee on Saturday I was thinking about the benefits of volunteering for the IET.  I know, I know, I should have been thinking about the committee business under discussion.  However, I'm afraid I shall have to admit that, on occassion, my mind does wander during a meeting.   Especially when that meeting lasts all day, and has very few breaks...  So, I was pondering what volunteering for the IET had done for me, and realised that the best benefit I'd received was a completely unexpected one - I've met some great people, and made some (hopefully) life-long friends.  read more...
  • A quick pre-Christmas update...
    I promised to do an update on my CEng application, so here it is: it's ready to submit!  Joe , my International Professional Registration Advisor (IPRA) gave me some very detailed feedback on my first draft, which was brilliant.  I amended my application according, and sent it to my supporters for their comments.  A few more tweaks (my colleague pointed out I hadn't included any of the investigation work I've done), and it was ready to go.  I must admit, the process so far has been a lot easier than I anticipated.  I'm not suggesting that it's easy to get CEng; rather I'm saying that the process of applying has been straight forward.  Which is a very good thing!  I imagine it will be some time before I hear anything further - my supporters need to fill out their forms, and then the whole lot need to be assessed.  But I've done the first major step :) In other news, I've (happily) relinquished a couple of my volunteer roles.  I'm now just an ordinary member of both the Christchurch Local Network committee, and the NZ Forum committee.  I've been a bit over-committed this year, so I'm hoping that things will now be a bit less hectic, and I'll be able to give all my committments the time they deserve...  read more...
  • To be or not to be (CEng), that is the question...
    I'll freely admit that I've always been firmly in the "Not to be CEng" camp up until recently.  I think it's a by-product of living in a tiny country (even if we like to pretend we're not).  Well, that combined with the fact that I don't want to live anywhere else.  We all know each other in my industry: we see each other's work, we talk on the phone when projects overlap, and if going on a site visit to another city, we pop into the competition's office for a catch-up if time permits.  I guess that's just what happens when you work in a very specialised industry in a very small country.  So, I had thought there was no reason for me to be chartered, apart from personal satisfaction.  Both clients and competition know who I am, and the quality of my work, so there's really no one I need to prove my competance to.  However, I've had a change of heart, and I've decided I'm going to go for it after all... read more...